When to go to the ER for a stroke

Stroke Patient

If someone you know is showing signs of a stroke, you need to act immediately.

When it comes to a stroke, time equals brain cells. The longer a stroke goes unnoticed, the more brain cells die and that can often lead to irreversible effects.

Knowing the signs and symptoms, as well as when it’s time to go to the ER can save someone from damaging effects and often times, death.

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Tips for preventing colorectal cancer

colorectal-cancer-prevention

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer for both men and women, and it is the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Although it is common and deadly, it’s estimated that more than half of all cases of colorectal are preventable.

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Spring clean your diet

You can improve your nutrition by eating more vegetables, like salad

Spring cleaning is for more than just a reason to straighten up your home.

While New Year’s resolutions come and often go, spring is a great time to get a fresh start on improving your daily nutrition. As you welcome the new season, take an opportunity to clean up your diet as well.

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When you should go to the doctor vs. the emergency room

Woman sick with a head cold

When it comes to being sick, it can be hard to know where to go to find relief fast. For some people, their conditions can mean a trip to the emergency room. For others, their illnesses can “wait” until you can get in to see your primary care provider.

How do you know where to draw the line? Which conditions should be seen by a primary care doctor, and what types of illnesses should be seen by an ER provider?

To help you determine whether you should go to the doctor or the ER, the care team at Logansport Memorial Hospital has put together a list.

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Stress-free patient advocacy: Hints for helping loved ones

patient advocate helping elderly parent review medical bill

Advocacy requires a lot of hard work, but it’s one of the greatest gifts you can give another person.

Many caregivers help manage day-to-day care giving tasks, doing all kinds of things like fixing WiFi, shoveling snow, paying bills to cooking meals, doing laundry, cleaning up around the house. Other caregivers may also act as patient advocates and handle healthcare-related tasks, doing everything from setting up doctor visits to managing medications.

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